Thursday, August 21, 2014

Diary of Alexander G. Downing: Thursday, October 22, 1863

We are glad to be at home again in camp after eleven days' absence. Most of that time we were in bivouac without any protection — two nights in soaking rainstorms. Our heavy duties begin again — fatigue duty and camp guard, fourteen of our number being on guard today. Our regimental payrolls for two months' pay were made out and we signed them today. There is no news from the army in the East, and all is quiet here in the West.

Source: Alexander G. Downing, Edited by Olynthus B., Clark, Downing’s Civil War Diary, p. 148-9

Diary of Private Charles H. Lynch: July 24, 1863

Marching orders. Broke camp. After a short march, go into camp on high ground near the Potomac River. Plenty of water here where we could bathe and wash our clothes, hang them on the bushes and wait for them to dry. We also used the river water to drink and make coffee. The current ran very swift at this point.

(During my army life I drank, made coffee, fished, bathed, washed my clothes, waded through, its blue waters. When clear it was blue as one looked at it. When storms came it was yellow, the color of Virginia and Maryland mud.)

We only enjoyed our camp near the Potomac for a few days, when marching orders were received, to report at Hagerstown, Maryland, about ten miles from Sharpsburg, or about eight from our camp. At Hagerstown the Seminary and the grounds were used for a rebel prison and hospital, where we were to do guard and picket duty. Many of the poor fellows confined there died from wounds and disease. While the duty was not very laborious, it was not very pleasant. This is a fine section of Maryland, scenery fine. A large spring, walled in, in the center of the city, from which we obtained water. Quite a large number were confined here as prisoners of war. Here we also came in contact with an army of pedicules, which kept us very busy fighting them. Our boys claimed they bore on their backs the letters C. S. A., Confederate States America. The Seminary and grounds covered quite a tract of land. Our camp was placed as far as could be and still be on the grounds enclosed.

SOURCE: Charles H. Lynch, The Civil War Diary, 1862-1865, of Charles H. Lynch 18th Conn. Vol's, p. 27-8

5th Ohio Cavalry

Regiment originally organized at Camp Dick Corwin, near Cincinnati, Ohio, October 23-November 14, 1861, as 2nd Ohio Cavalry. Designation changed by Gov. Dennison November, 1861. Duty at Camp Dick Corwin till November 5, 1861, and at Camp Dennison, Ohio, till March, 1862. Ordered to Paducah, Ky. 2nd Battalion left Cincinnati, Ohio, February 28, and 1st and 3rd Battalions on March 1, 1862. Attached to District of Paducah, Ky., March, 1862. Sherman's 5th Division, Army of the Tennessee, to April, 1862. 1st and 2nd Battalions attached to 4th Division, Army of the Tennessee, to July, 1862. District of Memphis, Tenn., to September, 1862. District of Jackson, Tenn., to November, 1862. Lee's 2nd Brigade, Cavalry Division, 13th Army Corps (Old), Dept. of the Tennessee, to December, 1862. Lee's 2nd Brigade, Cavalry Division, 16th Army Corps, to March, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, 16th Army Corps, to April, 1863. 4th Brigade, 5th Division, District of Memphis, Tenn., 16th Army Corps, to August, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, 16th Army Corps, to October, 1863. 3rd Battalion (Cos. "E," "H," "I" and "K") attached to 3rd Division, Army Tennessee, April, 1862. 2nd Division, Army Tennessee, to July, 1862, 2nd Division, District of Corinth, Miss., to November, 1862. Unattached Cavalry, District of Corinth, Miss., 13th Army Corps (Old), Dept. Tennessee, to December, 1862. District of Corinth, Miss., 16th Army Corps, to March, 1863. Cavalry Brigade, 2nd Division, District of Corinth, 16th Army Corps, to May, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, 16th Army Corps, to August, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, 16th Army Corps, to October, 1863. Regiment attached to Headquarters 15th Army Corps October, 1863, to April, 1864. Cavalry, 3rd Division, 15th Army Corps, to October, 1864. 2nd Brigade, Kilpatrick's 3rd Division, Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi, to January, 1865. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Cavalry Division, to June, 1865. Dept. of North Carolina to October, 1865.

SERVICE. – March from Danville to Savannah, Tenn., March 10-11, 1862. Expedition to Mobile & Ohio Railroad to destroy bridges March 14-15. Beach Creek Bridge, Tenn., March 13. Near Eastport, Miss., March 14. Burnsville March 14-15. Reach Pittsburg Landing March 15. Skirmish Pittsburg Landing March 16. Reconnoissance toward Corinth March 16. Black Jack Forest March 16 (Detachment). Near Shiloh Church March 24 (1st and 2nd Battalions). Purdy Road near Adamsville March 31 (Co. "I"). Expedition to Chickasaw, Ala., and Eastport, Miss., April 1. Near Monterey, Tenn., April 3. Crump's Landing April 4 (Detachment). Battle of Shiloh April 6-7. Corinth Road April 8. Beech Creek Bridge April 13 (3rd Battalion). Affair with Cavalry April 14. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Pursuit to Tuscumbia River June 1-6. March to Memphis, Tenn., via LaGrange and Grand Junction June 10-July 27 (1st and 2nd Battalions), and duty there till September. Horn Lake Creek August 16 (Cos. "A," "C"). 3rd Battalion at Corinth, Miss., till August, 1863. 1st and 2nd Battalion moved from Memphis to Jackson, Tenn., September 6-12, 1862. Battle of Corinth, Miss., October 3-4 (3rd Battalion). Pursuit to Ripley October 5-12 (3rd Battalion). Battle of the Hatchie, Metamora, October 5, 1862 (1st and 2nd Battalions). Chewalla October 5 (3rd Battalion). Ruckersville and near Ripley October 7 (3rd Battalion). Guard Mobile & Ohio Railroad at Glendale October 15 to November 8, 1862 (3rd Battalion). Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign November, 1862, to January, 1863. About Oxford, Miss., December 1-3, 1862. Free Bridge December 3. Water Valley Station December 4. Coffeeville December 5. Raid from Corinth to Tupelo December 13-19 (3rd Battalion). Operations against Forest December 18, 1862, to January 3, 1863 (1st and 2nd Battalions). Lexington December 18, 1862. Salem Cemetery near Jackson December 19. Davis Mills, Wolf River, December 21 (Cos. "B," "M"). Guard Memphis & Charleston Railroad till March, 1863 (1st and 2nd Battalions), and duty at and about Memphis, Tenn., till August, 1863 (1st and 2nd Battalions). Expedition from Memphis, Tenn., to Coldwater, Miss., April 18-24, 1863. Tuscumbia, Ala., February 22 (3rd Battalion). Hernando April 18. Perry's Ferry, Coldwater River, April 19. Expedition from Memphis toward Hernando, Miss., May 23-24 (Detachment). Scouts from Memphis toward Hernando, Miss., May 26 and 28 (Detachments). Operations in Northeast Mississippi June 13-22 (3rd Battalion). Operations in Northeastern Mississippi June 15-25 (1st and 2nd Battalions). New Albany and Coldwater June 19 (3rd Battalion). Hernando June 20 (3rd Battalion). Adkin's Plantation, Mud Creek Bottom, Rocky Crossing, Tallahatchie River and Hernando, June 20 (3rd Battalion). Near Memphis July 16 and 18. At Camp Davies till October. Wartrace September 6. Joined Gen. Sherman at Chickasaw, Ala., and march to Chattanooga, Tenn., leading advance. Operations on Memphis & Charleston Railroad in Alabama October 10-30. Cane Creek and Barton's Station October 20. Dickson's Station October 20. Cherokee Station October 21. Cane Creek and Barton's Station October 26. Bear Creek, Tuscumbia, October 27. Cherokee Station October 29. Barton's Station October 31. Guarding trains, escort and courier duty during battles of Chattanooga, Tenn., November 23-25. Pursuit to Ringgold, Ga., November 26-27. March to relief of Knoxville, Tenn., November 28-December 8. Near Loudon December 2. (3rd Battalion Joined Long's Brigade in Knoxville.) Expedition to Tellico Plains after Longstreet's trains December 6-11. Report to Gen. Howard at Athens, Tenn. Picket Hiawassee River and courier duty between Grant and Burnside. Regiment veteranize at Larkinsville, Ala., January, 1864. Near Kelly's Plantation, Sulphur Springs, April 11 (Detachment). Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1 to September 8. Advance guard of 3rd Division, 15th Army Corps, to near Rome, Ga. Operations on line of Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Old Church June 13. March to Kingston June 22. Duty there and at Cartersville guarding railroad till November 7. Cartersville July 24. Canton August 22. Shadow Church and Westbrooks near Fairburn October 2 (Detachment). Marietta October 4. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Bear Creek Station November 16. East Macon, Walnut Creek, November 20. Waynesboro November 27-28. Buckhead Creek or Reynolds' Plantation November 28. Rocky Creek Church December 2. Ebenezer Creek December 8. Siege of Savannah. December 10-21. Altamaha Bridge December 17. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Williston, S.C., February 8. North Edisto February 12-13. Monroe's Cross Roads March 16. Taylor's Hole Creek, Averysboro, N. C., March 16. Battle of Bentonville March 19-21. Goldsboro March 23. Advance on Raleigh April 10-13. Raleigh April 13. Morrisville April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. Picket near Raleigh till April 30. Duty in Sub-District of Morgantown, District of Western North Carolina, Dept. of North Carolina, to October, 1865. Mustered out October 30, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 26 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 140 Enlisted men by disease. Total 170.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1475-6

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

John Brown to his Children, May 7, 1855

Rockford, Winnebago County, Ill., May 7, 1855.

Dear Children, — I am here with my stock of cattle to sell, in order to raise funds so that I can move to North Elba, and think I may get them off in about two weeks. Oliver is here with me. We shall get on so late that we can put in no crops (which I regret), so that you had perhaps better plant or sow what you can conveniently on “95.”1 I heard from John and Jason and their families (all well) at St. Louis on the 21st April, expecting to leave there on the evening of that day to go up the Missouri for Kansas. My family at Akron were well on the 4th inst. As I may be detained here some days after you get this, I wish you to write me at once what wheat and corn are worth at Westport now, as near as you can learn. People are here so busy sowing their extensive fields of grain, that I cannot get them even to see my cattle now. Direct to this place, care of Shepard Leach, Esq.

 SOURCE: Franklin B. Sanborn, The Life and Letters of John Brown, p. 193

Major Rutherford B. Hayes to Sophia Birchard Hayes, August 4, 1861

Weston, Virginia, August 4, 1861.

Dear Mother: — I write often now, as we soon pass out of reach of mails. We hear the news by telegraph here now from all the home towns, but mails are uncertain and irregular. We are very healthy, but the weather is hotter than any I have known in a great while. Our wounded lieutenant, Jewett, is doing well. His father is here nursing him. The fine large hospital for all this region of country, having one hundred patients belonging to different regiments, is in charge of Dr. Joe. It is the courthouse. The people here do not find us much of a nuisance. Of course, in some respects we are so, but all things considered, the best of the people like to see us. I mean to go to church this pleasant Sunday. My only clerical acquaintance here is an intelligent Catholic priest who called to see Colonel Scammon. I have been cross-examining a couple of prisoners — one a Methodist preacher — both fair sort of men, and I hope not guilty of any improper acts. Good-bye.

Affectionately,
R. B. Hayes.
Mrs. Sophia Hayes.

SOURCE: Charles Richard Williams, editor, Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes, Volume 2, p. 55

Major-General Thomas J. Jackson to Mary Anna Morrison Jackson, April 18, 1863

. . . I am beginning to look for my darling and my baby. I shouldn't be surprised to hear at any time that they were coming, and I tell you there would be one delighted man. Last night I dreamed that my little wife and I were on opposite sides of a room, in the centre of which was a table, and the little baby started from her mother, making her way along under the table, and finally reached her father. And what do you think she did when she arrived at her destination? She just climbed up on her father and kissed him! And don't you think he was a happy man? But when he awoke he found it all a delusion. I am glad to hear that she enjoys out-doors, and grows, and coos, and laughs. How I would love to see her sweet ways! That her little chubby hands have lost their resemblance to mine is not regretted by me.  . . . Should I write to you to have any more pantaloons made for me, please do not have much gold braid about them. I became so ashamed of the broad gilt band that was on the cap you sent as to induce me to take it off. I like simplicity.

SOURCE: Mary Anna Jackson, Life and Letters of General Thomas J. Jackson (Stonewall Jackson), p. 421-2

Major-General George G. Meade to Margaretta Sergeant Mead, December 16, 1863

Headquarters Army Of The Potomac, December 16, 1863.

I received yesterday your letter of the 13th inst., and would have answered it at once, but about 2 P. M. we had a sudden invasion of Muscovites, some twenty-four officers of the fleet visiting the army, and I had to give them my attention till after 10 P. M., when they returned to Alexandria. I had the Sixth Corps paraded and some artillery to show them. We had great fun with them in mounting them on horseback, which they all insisted on attempting; but we had not proceeded far before one was thrown and some half a dozen ran away with. After the review we gave them some dinner, with plenty of brandy and whisky, and, making them jolly, sent them back highly delighted with their visit and reception. They appeared intelligent and gentlemanly, almost all speaking English quite well. The admiral did not honor us, Captain Bourtakoff being the senior officer with the party.

I presume you have seen how highly honored I have been in having my name associated with General Hooker by Mr. Wilson, in the Senate, in a vote of thanks for the Gettysburg campaign. Why they confined the including of my predecessors to Hooker I am at a loss to imagine. He certainly had no more to do with my operations and success at Gettysburg than either Burnside or McClellan; but I presume Mr. Wilson, who is a great friend and admirer of Hooker, was a little doubtful of a distinct resolution on his behalf getting through.

SOURCE: George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Vol. 2, p. 161

Brigadier-General Thomas Kilby Smith to Elizabeth Budd Smith, June 9, 1864

Steamer “silver Moon,”
Mississippi River, Near Cairo, Ill., June 9, 1864.

I am on my way home and may reasonably be expected by you on Monday, 15th, by the morning up train, God willing and weather permitting. My retinue is small, as I am on brief furlough. You will only need to make preparations for three servants, two male, one female, four horses, a small dog and myself. You need not put yourself out, as the horses and servants are used to bivouac.

SOURCE: Walter George Smith, Life and letters of Thomas Kilby Smith, p. 363

Senator James W. Grimes to Elizabeth S. Nealley Grimes, June 4, 1860

Washington, June 4, 1860.

We have just had a four hours speech from Sumner on the “Barbarism of Slavery.” In a literary point of view it was of course excellent. As a bitter, denunciatory oration, it could hardly be exceeded in point of style and finish. But, to me, many parts of it sounded harsh, vindictive, and slightly brutal. It is all true that slavery tends to barbarism, but Mr. Sumner furnishes no remedy for the evils he complains of. His speech has done the Republicans no good. Its effect has been to exasperate the Southern members, and render it utterly impossible for Mr. Sumner to exercise any influence here for the good of his State. Mr. C. F. Adams made a manly, statesmanly speech in the House of Representatives, four days ago, which was attentively listened to by everybody. He read it, as did Mr. Sumner his.

Mr. Seward is now here, and made a speech in Executive session the other day on the Mexican Treaty, that to my view showed more intellectual vigor than did his speech which you heard. His speech to which I refer was short, extemporaneous, and very able, converting almost the whole Senate to his views.

The nomination of Lincoln strikes the mass of the people with great favor. He is universally regarded as a scrupulously honest man, and a genuine man of the people.

SOURCE: William Salter, The Life of James W. Grimes, p. 127-8

Diary of Corydon E. Fuller: Tuesday, April 4, 1865

During the day great preparations had been made for the grand illumination to come off in the evening. About 7½ o'clock P. M., we rode to the city, with Bro. Summy's people, and remained until near 10½ o’clock. We rode down Seventh street, past the Post-office, to E street; then along that street to Ninth street; then down Ninth street to Pennsylvania avenue, and then up the avenue to the War Department, where we left the carriage and walked down Seventeenth street, past the War Department, nearly to the Navy Department. Four bands were at the War Department, and made excellent music all the evening. Over the north portico was erected a magnificent evergreen arch, beneath which was suspended a transparency with the motto, “The Union must and shall be preserved,” and beneath, the word “Richmond.” The pillars were wreathed with flags, and in each window were twenty-four lights. The effect was very brilliant. Several thousand people filled the avenue and Seventeenth street, both north and west of the War Department. The Navy Department, Winder's building, the “Art Hall,” and several other buildings near, were brilliantly illuminated, and added much to the effect. We then went around to the President's house, which was a blaze of light; while from Lafayette Square beautiful rockets were sent up, exploding in a shower of stars. We next went down the avenue past the Treasury. Over the north door of the State Department, which is in the Treasury building, was the motto, “At home, Union is Order, and Order is Peace; Abroad, Union is Strength, and Strength is Peace.” Over the east door the motto was, “Peace and good will to all nations, but no entangling alliances and no intervention.” Over the door of the National Currency Bureau of the United States Treasury Department, was the motto, “U. S. Greenbacks and U. S. Grant; Grant gives the Greenbacks a metallic ring.” Below this was another transparency presenting a facsimile of a ten dollar compound interest note. Jay Cooke's banking office had transparencies as follows: over the north window, “5-20”; over the south window, “7-30.” These were connected by another, bearing the inscription. “The bravery of our Army, the valor of our Navy, sustained by our Treasury, upon the faith and persistence of a patriotic people.” Hundreds of other buildings were illuminated, but I can not mention them. We walked down Pennsylvania avenue as far as Seventh street; then up Seventh street to the Post-office, and down F street, stopping in front of the Patent Office, where some ten or fifteen thousand persons were congregated, listening to speeches. We did not go up to the Capitol, as the cars were crowded and the walk too much for Mary. It was very brilliantly illuminated to the very top of the dome, and in the distance presented a magnificent spectacle. Taken as a whole, the illumination was by far the best I have ever seen, and is said to have been the best ever seen in this city.

SOURCE: Corydon Eustathius Fuller, Reminiscences of James A. Garfield: With Notes Preliminary and Collateral, p. 376-7

Diary of Alexander G. Downing: Wednesday, October 21, 1863

Our orders came and we left this morning at 6 o'clock for Vicksburg. We arrived in camp at noon, twelve miles from where we started. All is quiet here and no news of any importance.

Source: Alexander G. Downing, Edited by Olynthus B., Clark, Downing’s Civil War Diary, p. 148

Diary of Private Charles H. Lynch: July 20, 1863

We left Upperville, near Snicker's Gap. very early in the morning, having served in the 3d Corps, Army of the Potomac about five weeks. On the march back we met the 12th Corps, meeting the 5th and 20th Connecticut Regiments of that corps. Met Charlie Corey, a boyhood friend from my old home in Hanover, New London County. It was a short meeting but we talked fast. Charlie had been in service a little over two years in the 5th Regiment, while I had been in eleven months. His mother often read his letters to me before I came to be a soldier. A pleasant meeting for a few moments. On our backward march we kept pushing along, stopping to rest at one point. Blackberries grew wild, we picked our coffee cups full and ate them while we marched along. Nothing of special interest took place, but by the time we reached Harper's Ferry, twenty miles march, we were tired and foot-sore. After a short rest and rations we were obliged to push on toward Sharpsburg, twenty miles further on. Darkness coming on we did not have the hot sun beating down upon us. The marching was over rough, stony roads, up hill and down. Reaching Sharpsburg along in the night, we learned the boys were in camp about two miles out of town, so we pushed on, reaching the camp at midnight, a march of about forty miles. The boys were sleeping, except the guard and the pickets. They did not know that we had arrived. We were glad to drop down on the ground and get sleep and rest after the severe march from Upperville, Virginia, to the town of Sharpsburg, Maryland. The command now numbered about two hundred. Consolidated into two companies. Our meeting was a very happy one. We talked over the events that had taken place during the past few weeks that we had been separated, and wondered how our boys in prison were getting along.

SOURCE: Charles H. Lynch, The Civil War Diary, 1862-1865, of Charles H. Lynch 18th Conn. Vol's, p. 26-7

4th Ohio Cavalry

Organized at Cincinnati, Lima, St. Maryes and Camp Dennison, Ohio, August to November, 1861. Moved to Camp Dennison, Ohio, November 23, thence to Jeffersonville, Ind., December 5, and to Bacon Creek, Ky., December 27. Attached to 3rd Division, Army Ohio, to October. 1862. 2nd Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army Ohio, to November, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland, to January, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland, to March, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland, to October, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi, to August, 1865.

SERVICE. – Action at Roan's Tan Yard, Silver Creek, Mo., January 8, 1862. Advance on Bowling Green, Ky., February 10-15, 1862. Occupation of Bowling Green February 15. Occupation of Nashville, Tenn., February 23. Action near Nashville March 8-9. Camp Jackson March 24. Reconnoissance to Shelbyville, Tullahoma and McMinnville March 25-28. Capture of Huntsville, Ala., April 11. Bridgeport, Ala., April 23. West Bridge, near Bridgeport, April 29. Shelbyville Road April 24. Tuscumbia April 25. Bolivar April 28. Pulaski May 11. Watkins' Ferry May 2. Athens May 8. Fayetteville May 14. Elk River May 20. Fayetteville May 26. Whitesburg, Ala., May 29. Huntsville June 4-5. Winchester, Tenn., June 10. Battle Creek June 21. Huntsville July 2. Stevenson, Ala., July 28. Bridgeport August 27 (Detachment). Fort McCook, Battle Creek, August 27 (Detachment). March to Louisville in pursuit of Bragg August 28-September 26. Huntsville September 1. Tyree Springs September 13. Glasgow, Ky., September 18. Pursuit of Bragg into Kentucky October 1-10. Bardstown Pike, near Mt. Washington, October 1. Frankford October 9. Pursuit of Bragg from Perryville to Loudon October 10-22. Lexington October 17-18. Bardstown and Pittman's Cross Roads October 19. Lawrenceburg October 25. Sandersville, Tenn., November 6. Reconnoissance from Rural Hill December 20. Near Nashville, Tenn., December 24. Advance on Murfreesboro December 26-30. Franklin December 26. Wilkinson's Cross Roads December 29. Near Murfreesboro December 29-30. Battle of Stone's River December 30-31, 1862, and January 1-3, 1863. Overall's Creek December 31, 1862. Insane Asylum January 3, 1863. Shelbyville Pike January 5. Expedition to Auburn, Liberty and Alexandria February 3-5. Bradysville March 1. Expedition toward Columbia March 4-14. Rutherford Creek March 10-11. Expedition from Murfreesboro to Auburn, Liberty, Snow Hill, etc., April 2-6. Smith's Ford April 2. Snow Hill, Woodbury and Liberty April 3. Franklin April 10. Expedition to McMinnville April 20-30. Reconnoissance to Lavergne May 12. Expedition to Middleton and skirmishes May 21-22. Near Murfreesboro June 3. Expedition to Smithville June 4-5. Snow Hill June 4. Smithville June 5. Middle Tennessee or Tullahoma Campaign June 23-July 7. Morris Ford, Elk River, July 2. Kelly's Ford July 2. Expedition to Huntsville July 13-22. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Passage of Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River, and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August I6-September 22. Reconnoissance from Stevenson, Ala., to Trenton, Ga., August 28-31. Alpine, Ga., September 3 and 8. Reconnoissance from Alpine toward Lafayette September 10. Battle of Chickamauga, Ga., September 19-21. Operations against Wheeler and Roddy September 30-October 17. McMinnville October 4. Farmington October 7. Sim's Farm, near Shelbyville, October 7. Farmington October 9. Maysville, Ala., November 4. Winchester November 22. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Raid on East Tennessee & Georgia Railroad November 24-27. Charleston November 26. Cleveland November 27. March to relief of Knoxville, Tenn., November 28-December 8. Charleston, Tenn., December 28 (Detachment). Expedition to Murphey, N. C., December 6-11. Expedition from Scottsboro, Ala., toward Rome, Ga., January 25-February 5, 1864. Ringgold, Ga., February 8. Demonstration on Dalton, Ga., February 22-27. Near Dalton February 23-24. Tunnel Hill, Buzzard's Roost Gap and Rocky Faced Ridge February 24-25. Scout to Dedmon's Trace April 10. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1-September 8, 1864. Courtland Road, Ala., May 26. Pond Springs, near Courtland, May 27. Moulton May 28-29. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. McAffee's Cross Roads June 11. Noonday Creek June 15-19 and 27. Near Marietta June 23. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Nickajack Creek July 2-5. Rottenwood Creek July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Alpharetta July 10. Garrard's Raid to Covington July 22-24. Siege of Atlanta July 24-August 15. Garrard's Raid to South River July 27-31. Flat Rock Bridge and Lithonia July 28. Kilpatrick's Raid around Atlanta August 18-22. Red Oak and Flint River August 19. Jonesborough August 19. Lovejoy Station August 20. Operations at Chattahoochie River Bridge August 26-September 2. Sandtown September 1. Ordered to Nashville, Tenn., September 21, thence to Louisville November 8, and duty there till January, 1865. Moved to Gravelly Springs, Ala., January 12, and duty there till March. Wilson's Raid to Macon, Ga., March 22-April 24. Selma April 2. Montgomery April 12. Macon April 20. Duty at Macon till May 23, and at Nashville, Tenn., till July. Mustered out July 15, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 50 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 169 Enlisted men by disease. Total 225.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1475

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Abraham Lincoln to Senator Lyman Trumbull, December 28, 1857

BLOOMINGTON, December 28,1857.
Hon. Lyman Trumbull,

Dear Sir: What does the New York Tribune mean by its constant eulogizing and admiring and magnifying Douglas? Does it, in this, speak the sentiments of the Republicans at Washington? Have they concluded that the Republican cause generally can be best promoted by sacrificing us here in Illinois? If so, we would like to know it soon; it will save us a great deal of labor to surrender at once.

As yet I have heard of no Republican here going over to Douglas, but if the Tribune continues to din his praises into the ears of its five or ten thousand readers in Illinois, it is more than can be hoped that all will stand firm. I am not complaining, I only wish for a fair understanding. Please write me at Springfield.

Your obt. servant,
A. LINCOLN

SOURCE: Horace White, The Life of Lyman Trumbull, p. 87

John Brown to his Children, February 13, 1855

Akron, Ohio, Feb. 13, 1855.

Dear Children, — I have deferred answering your very acceptable letter of January 30 for one week, in the hope of having some news to write you about Owen and Frederick; but they are so negligent about writing that I have not a word to send now. I got quite an. encouraging word about Kansas from Mr. Adair the other day. He had before given quite a gloomy picture of things. He and family were all well. The friends here were all well a few days since. John and Wealthy have gone back to Vernon, John taking with him my old surveyor's instruments, in consideration of having learned to survey. I have but little to write that will interest you, so I need not be lengthy. I think we may be able to get off in March, and I mean to sell some of our Devon cattle in order to effect it, if I can do no better. I should send on Watson within a few days, if I thought I could manage to get along with the family and cattle without his help. I may conclude to do so still before we get away. The last of January and February, up to yesterday, have been very remarkable for uninterrupted cold weather for this section. We were glad to learn that you had succeeded in getting the house so comfortable. I want Johnny should he so good a boy that “95 will not turn him off.” Can you tell whether the Stout lot was ever redeemed in December or not by the owners?

 SOURCE: Franklin B. Sanborn, The Life and Letters of John Brown, p. 192

Diary of Major Rutherford B. Hayes: Sunday August 4, 1861

Visited the hospital. It is airy and comfortable — the court-house of the county, a large good building. The judge's bench was full of invalids, convalescent, busily writing letters to friends at home. Within the bar and on the benches provided for the public were laid straw bedticks in some confusion, but comfortable. A side room contained the very sick, seven or eight in number. The total inmates about seventy-five. Most of them are able to walk about and are improving; very few are likely to die there. One poor fellow, uncomplaining and serene, with a good American face, is a German tailor, Fifth Street, Cincinnati; speaks little English, was reading a history of the Reformation in German. I inquired his difficulty. He had been shot by the accidental discharge of a musket falling from a stack; a ball and several buckshot pierced his body. He will recover probably. My sympathies were touched for a handsome young Canadian, Scotch or English. He had measles and caught cold. A hacking cough was perhaps taking his life. Nobody from the village calls to see them!

A hot day but some breeze. We hear that Colonel Matthews with the right wing was, on the morning of the third day from here, near Bulltown, twenty-seven miles distant. Governor Wise is somewhere near Lewisburg in Greenbrier County. Cox1 is in no condition to engage him and I hope will not do it. I rather hope we shall raise a large force and push on towards Lynchburg and east Tennessee. Jewettt is doing well.
_______________

1 General Jacob D. Cox.

SOURCE: Charles Richard Williams, editor, Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes, Volume 2, p. 54-5

Major-General Thomas J. Jackson to Mary Anna Morrison Jackson, April 10, 1863

April 10th.

I trust that God is going to bless us with great success, and in such a manner as to show that it is all His gift; and I trust and pray that it will lead our country to acknowledge Him, and to live in accordance with His will as revealed in the Bible. There appears to be an increased religious interest among our troops here. Our chaplains have weekly meetings on Tuesdays; and the one of this week was more charming than the preceding one.

SOURCE: Mary Anna Jackson, Life and Letters of General Thomas J. Jackson (Stonewall Jackson), p. 419

Major-General George G. Meade to Margaretta Sergeant Mead, December 12, 1863

Headquarters Army Of The Potomac, December 12, 1863.

The mail has just come in and brings to-day's Washington Chronicle, which announces I am not to be relieved. As this paper is edited by Forney, who is supposed to have confidential relations with the Administration, I presume this announcement may be considered semi-official.

SOURCE: George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Vol. 2, p. 161

Brigadier-General Thomas Kilby Smith to Elizabeth Budd Smith, April 29, 1864

Mississippi Squadron, Flag Ship “Cricket,”
Alexandria, April 29, 1864.
My Dear Wife:

I am safe after a most severe campaign. I had three fights, battles, on my own hook, inasmuch as I had the honor of bringing up the rear of the army to this point. These three fights were exclusively my own, and in every instance entirely victorious. I have only time to say that my opinion is, we (I mean A. J. Smith's command) will get through safely to the Mississippi; after that, there will be work enough for us. I will give you full details so soon as opportunity offers. Meanwhile, rest assured of my health and personal safety. Admiral Porter is safe and sitting by my side as I write. He is a noble fellow, game as a pheasant; so is old A. J. a perfect trump.

I hope you are all well. I am in first rate spirits, stiff upper lip, “never say die.” Do not be discouraged about me, in the slightest degree. We can whip these fellows whenever we get the chance.

SOURCE: Walter George Smith, Life and letters of Thomas Kilby Smith, p. 362-3

Diary of Corydon E. Fuller: Monday, April 3, 1865

Richmond has fallen! The flag of the Union waves in triumph over the rebel Capitol! The news reached the War Department about 11 o'clock this forenoon, and such a scene of rejoicing and shouting and general jubilee I have never before seen. Old men acted like boys, and young men are half crazed with delight. The first intimation we had of it in our office was from a wild hurrah from the next floor below, on which is Secretary Stanton's room, and within five minutes at least a thousand men were gathered about the west door, and shouting and shrieking in their wild delight. Every office was abandoned; the clerks determined to take a holiday, and the Secretary of War soon after issued orders to close all the offices. Speeches were made by Secretary Stanton, Vice-President Johnson, Gen. Nye, and others. Salutes were fired all about the city, and not less than five hundred guns spoke in echoing thunder of the glorious victory. Great preparations are being made for a grand illumination. The latest reports say that we have taken 25,000 prisoners, and that the capture of Lee's entire army seems certain.

SOURCE: Corydon Eustathius Fuller, Reminiscences of James A. Garfield: With Notes Preliminary and Collateral, p. 376

Senator James W. Grimes to Elizabeth S. Nealley Grimes, Sunday, December 11, 1859

I have just been to church, and heard a long and not remarkably entertaining sermon.

I have about as much as I can do to restrain myself from plunging into the debate in the Senate on John Brown, but I exercise self-denial, and do not.

SOURCE: William Salter, The Life of James W. Grimes, p. 122

Diary of Alexander G. Downing: Tuesday, October 20, 1863

General Logan's Division returned to Vicksburg today. Our brigade pickets were called in and we were expecting also to return to Vicksburg, but had to remain here in bivouac all day. The health of our regiment is quite good now, and most of those away on sick furlough have returned to the regiment.

Source: Alexander G. Downing, Edited by Olynthus B., Clark, Downing’s Civil War Diary, p. 148

Diary of Charles H. Lynch: July 19, 1863

The enemy are marching up the Shenandoah Valley. They seem to have the lead. Came to a halt at Snicker's Gap, twenty miles south of Harper's Ferry, after making a forced march. Here Major Peale received orders for us to report at Sharpsburg, Maryland, where another detachment of our regiment was on duty.

SOURCE: Charles H. Lynch, The Civil War Diary, 1862-1865, of Charles H. Lynch 18th Conn. Vol's, p. 26

3rd Ohio Cavalry

Organized at Camp Worcester September 4-December 11, 1861. Moved to Camp Dennison, near Cincinnati, Ohio, January 14, 1862, and to Jeffersonville, Ind., February 21. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., March 2. Attached to 6th Division, Army Ohio, to June, 1862. Cavalry Brigade, Army Ohio, to September, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army Ohio, to November, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland, to January, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Army Cumberland, to March, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland, to October, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Wilson's Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi, to August, 1865.

SERVICE. – March with 6th Division, Army Ohio, from Nashville to Savannah, Tenn., March 29-April 6, 1862. Action at Lawrenceburg April 4 (1st Battalion). Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Guard duty along Memphis & Charleston Railroad June to August. Near Woodville, Ala., August 4. Expedition from Woodville to Guntersville, Ala. (3rd Battalion). Guntersville and Law's Landing August 28 (3rd Battalion). Expedition to Dunlap August 29-31. Old Deposit Ferry August 29 (3rd Battalion). March to Louisville, Ky., in pursuit of Bragg September 3-25. Glasgow, Ky., September 18. Munfordsville September 20-21 (1st Battalion). Pursuit of Bragg into Kentucky October 1-15. Bardstown Pike October 1. Near Bardstown October 4. Battle of Perryville October 8. Lexington October 17-18. Pursuit of Morgan to Gallatin, Tenn. March to Nashville, Tenn., and duty there till December 26. Tunnel Hill November 19. Advance on Murfreesboro December 26-30. Franklin December 26-27. Battle of Stone's River December 30-31, 1862, and January 1-3, 1863. Overall's Creek December 31. Stewart's Creek and Lavergne January 1, 1863. Conduct trains to Nashville and return. Insane Asylum January 3. Shelbyville Pike January 5. Near Woodbury January 19 (Cos. "A," "D," "E" and "F"). Bradysville Pike, near Murfreesboro, January 23. Expedition to Liberty, Auburn and Alexandria February 3-5. Vaught's Hill, Milton, February 18. Bradysville March 1. Expedition toward Columbia March 4-14. Chapel Hill March 5. Rutherford Creek March 10-11. Woodbury Pike March 27 (2nd Battalion). Expedition from Readyville to Woodbury April 2 (2nd Battalion). Smith's Ford April 2. Expedition from Murfreesboro to Auburn, Snow Hill, Liberty, etc., April 2-6. Snow Hill, Woodbury, April 3. Liberty April 3. Franklin April 9-10. Schoeppe House May 9. Reconnoissance from Lavergne May 12. Middleton May 21-22. Scout to Smithville June 4-5. Snow Hill June 4. Smithville June 5. Middle Tennessee or Tullahoma Campaign June 23-July 7. Morris Ford, Elk River, July 2. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Expedition to Huntsville July 13-22. Passage of Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River, and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Reconnoissance from Stevenson to Trenton, Ga., August 28-31. Reconnoissance from Winston's Gap to Broomtown Valley September 5. Alpine September 3 and 8. Reconnoissance from Alpine to Lafayette September 10. Battle of Chickamauga, Ga., September 19-21. Operations against Wheeler and Roddy September 30-October 17. McMinnville October 4. Garrison's Creek, near Fosterville, October 6 (1st Battalion). Wartrace October 6 (1st Battalion). Farmington October 7. Sim's Farm, near Shelbyville, October 7. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Raid on East Tennessee & Georgia Railroad November 24-27. Charleston November 26. Cleveland November 27. March to relief of Knoxville November 28-December 8. Near Loudoun December 2. Philadelphia December 3. Expedition to Murphey, N. C., December 6-11. Regiment reenlisted January, 1864. Demonstration on Dalton, Ga., February 22-27. Near Dalton February 23. Tunnel Hill, Buzzard's Roost Gap and Rocky Faced Ridge February 23-25. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1-September 8. Courtland Road, Ala., May 26. Pond Springs, near Courtland, May 27. Moulton May 28-29. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 1. Rosswell June 10. McAffee's Cross Roads June 11. Noonday Creek June 15-19 and 27. Powder Springs June 20. Near Marietta June 23. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Nickajack Creek July 2-5. Big Shanty June 3. Rottenwood Creek July 4. On line of the Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Garrard's Raid to Covington July 22-24. Covington July 22. Siege of Atlanta July 24-August 15. Garrard's Raid to South River July 27-31. Flat Rock Bridge July 28. Peach Tree Road August 15. Kilpatrick's Raid around Atlanta August 18-22. Red Oak, Flint River and Jonesborough August 19. Lovejoy Station August 20. Jonesborough August 22. Operations at Chattahoochie River Bridge August 26-September 2. Occupation of Atlanta September 2. Florence September 17. Operations against Hood and Forest in North Georgia and North Alabama September 29-November 3. Near Lost Mountain October 4-7. New Hope Church October 5. Dallas October 7. Rome October 10-11. Narrows October 11. Coosaville Road, near Rome, October 13. Near Summerville October 18. Little River, Ala., October 20. Leesburg and Blue Pond October 21. King's Hill, near Gadsden, Ala., October 23. Ladiga, Terrapin Creek, October 28. Ordered to Louisville, Ky., and duty there till December. Ordered to Gravelly Springs, Ala., December 28, and duty there till March, 1865. Wilson's Raid to Macon, Ga., March 22-April 24. Selma April 2. Montgomery April 12. Pleasant Hill April 18. Double Bridges, Flint River, April 18. Macon, Ga., April 20. Duty at Macon and in Dept. of Georgia till August. Mustered out August 14, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 58 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 6 Officers and 229 Enlisted men by disease. Total 294.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1474-5

Monday, August 18, 2014

John Brown to his Children, January 3, 1855

Akron, Ohio, Jan. 3, 1855.

Dear Children, — Last night your letters to Jason were received (dated December 26), and I had the reading of them. I conclude from the long time mine to you from Albany was on the way, that you did not reply to it. On my return here from North Elba I was disappointed of about three hundred dollars for cattle sold to brother Frederick, and am still in the same condition, — he having gone to Illinois just before I left to go East, and not having returned nor written me a word since. This puts it out of my power to move my family at present, and will until I get my money, unless I sell off my Devon cattle, — which I cannot, without great sacrifice, before spring opens. Your remarks about hay make me doubt the propriety of taking on any cattle till spring, as I have here an abundance of feed. I am now entirely unable to say whether we can get off before spring or not. All are well here, so far as we know. Owen and Frederick were with their uncle Edward in Meridosia, Ill. (where they expect to winter), on the 23d December; they were well, and much pleased with the country, and with him. You can write them at that place, care of Edward Lusk, Esq. I may send on one of the boys before the family go, but am not now determined. Can write no more now for want of time. Write me, on receipt of this, any and every thing of use or interest .

Your affectionate father,
John Brown.

 SOURCE: Franklin B. Sanborn, The Life and Letters of John Brown, p. 191-2

Diary of Major Rutherford B. Hayes: August 3, 1861

Called on James T. Jackson, a Secessionist, for a map of Virginia — one of the Board of Public Works maps. He said he once had one but his brother had sold it to a captain in [the] Seventh Regiment. Called then on William E. Arnold, a lawyer and Union man. He offered every facility for getting information and gave such as he could; also lent us a good map. Hottest day yet. Dr. Joe ailing. Young Jewett doing well, but getting tired and sore.

SOURCE: Charles Richard Williams, editor, Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes, Volume 2, p. 54

Major-General Thomas J. Jackson to Mary Anna Morrison Jackson, March 14, 1863

March 14th.

The time has about come for campaigning, and I hope early next week to leave my room, and go into a tent near Hamilton's Crossing, which is on the railroad, about five miles from Fredericksburg. It is rather a relief to get where there will be less comfort than in a room, as I hope thereby persons will be prevented from encroaching so much upon my time. I am greatly behind in my reports, and am very desirous to get through with them before another campaign commences. Do you remember when my little wife used to come up to my headquarters in Winchester and talk with her esposo? I would love to see her sunny face peering into my room again.  . . . On next Monday there is to be a meeting of the chaplains of my corps, and I pray that good may result.  . . . I am now in camp, but I do not know of any house near by where you could be accommodated, should you come; and, moreover, I might not be here when you would arrive, as the season for campaigning has come. Before this time last year, the campaign had begun, and, so far as we can see, it may begin again at any time. The movements of the enemy must influence ours, and we can't say where we shall be a week hence.

SOURCE: Mary Anna Jackson, Life and Letters of General Thomas J. Jackson (Stonewall Jackson), p. 418-9

Major-General George G. Meade to Margaretta Sergeant Mead, December 11, 1863

Headquarters Army Of The Potomac, December 11, 1863.

I have not heard a word from Washington, but from what I see in the papers, and what I hear from officers returning from Washington, I take it my supersedure is decided upon, and the only question is who is to succeed me. I understand the President and Secretary Chase are very anxious to bring Hooker back; but Halleck and Stanton will undoubtedly oppose this. A compromise may perhaps be made by bringing Thomas1 here, and giving Hooker Thomas's army.

I have very kind letters from Gibbon and Hancock, both hoping I will not be relieved, and each saying they had not lost a particle of confidence in me. Many officers in the army have expressed the same feeling, and I really believe the voice of the army will sustain me. This, though, goes for nothing in Washington. I will not go to Washington to be snubbed by these people; they may relieve me, but I will preserve my dignity.
_______________

1 Major-General George H. Thomas, commanding the Army of the Cumberland.

SOURCE: George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Vol. 2, p. 160-1

Brigadier-General Thomas Kilby Smith to Eliza Walter Smith, March 24, 1864

Alexandria, La., March 24, 1864.
My Dear Mother:

We have had some skirmishing in making reconnaissance, and have taken one entire battery, horses and harness. Some four hundred prisoners and some six hundred horses. General Banks has not yet arrived, but is momentarily expected. The country on the north side of the river is pine woods and for the most part barren, though rolling and beautiful on the south side — that upon which Alexandria is situated. It is exceedingly rich and very highly cultivated in cotton and sugar plantations. Corn, clover, and other grasses grow, the clover especially, with wonderful luxuriance. The perfectly flat nature of the country gives a sameness that is wearisome, but at first view the beauty of the plain, as one rides through the plantations, is enchanting. Hereabouts they are all well-watered by the bayous and these can be led by ditching in any direction. The planters, taking advantage of this, have beautified their grounds with lakes and wandering streams, upon the shores of which to the water's edge grows the white clover, carpeting the ground at this season with its rich green leaves, the sod cut away for parterres and flowerbeds, all shaded with beautiful pines, Japan plums, pride of China, and others, the names of which you would not recognize, of the beauty of which you can hardly form an idea. Their houses are not very elegant. The Southerner as a general rule does not care much about his house; so that it has plenty of piazza (gallery, as they call it here), is painted white, with Venetian blinds at all the openings, he is satisfied. Some of the wealthiest of them have spent their lives in log houses, and the wigwam at Mackacheek would be entirely en regle as the mansion house of a sugar estate. They find all their enjoyment in the open air, and shelter from the rain and night dew is all they ask.

The inhabitants hereabouts are pretty tolerably frightened; our Western troops are tired of shilly shally, and this year will deal their blows very heavily. Past kindness and forbearance has not been appreciated or understood; frequently ridiculed. The people now will be terribly scourged. Quick, sharp, decisive, or, if not decisive, staggering blows will soon show them that we mean business. I anticipate, however.

The State of Louisiana founded a Seminary of Learning and Military Academy, not long since, of which General Sherman, by election, was made superintendent, and which he abandoned to take up arms for his government. The building is a fine, large, very expensive one, situate some four miles from Alexandria, and was thoroughly provided with all the adjuncts of a large college. It has recently been used as a hospital by the rebels. The people cherish the name of General Sherman, and mourn his loss. He had great popularity here. My newspaper dates are to the 14th inst. My news very vague. I have the intelligence of the promotion of Lieutenant-General Grant, General Sherman and General McPherson. This is all right. With the old woman I may say to you, “I told you so.” One year ago there was a fearful pressure made against all these officers, Grant and Sherman especially. Where are those, now, who villified them? I do not know if you preserve them, but I must ask, if you do, to look at some of my letters written during last February and March.

SOURCE: Walter George Smith, Life and letters of Thomas Kilby Smith, p. 361-2

Diary of Corydon E. Fuller: Saturday, March 4, 1865

The morning broke with black clouds and driving rain, and the prospect seemed exceedinglv gloomy. After breakfast I walked down to Pennsylvania avenue, under a dripping umbrella, and later, went to the Hall of Representatives. Spent an hour there, witnessing the close of the session. Nothing was done while I remained, except call the yeas and nays, amidst much confusion. The hour having arrived for the inauguration, I obtained a place in the mud, near the front of the platform, and stood there through the ceremonies. Many thousands were present; how many, I dare not attempt to guess. At 12 o'clock noon President Lincoln and Vice-President Johnson appeared upon the platform, which by that time was filled with Senators, Foreign Ministers, and other distinguished personages. The appearance of Mr. Lincoln was greeted with tumultuous shouts from the thousands gathered around, and after a short delay he arose and read his inaugural address. I heard every word of it. At its close, Chief Justice Chase arose and administered the oath of office, the President taking the Bible from his hands and kissing it, at the close of the oath. All the members of the Supreme Court were standing by. The crowd then began to disperse, amid the thunder of artillery which shook the Capitol, massive as it is, until the windows rattled at each explosion. I have omitted to mention that the rain ceased about half-past ten o'clock, and just as Mr. Lincoln arose to read his inaugural the sun burst through the clouds and shone full upon him and the company around him, as well as the thousands' gathered there. The remainder of the day and evening was glorious. Was the clearing up the stormy and unpropitious weather of the morning at midday an omen of the sunlight of success that shall soon gild the clouds that now hang so darkly around our national sky? Toward night I called at James' room and had a pleasant time until about eight o'clock. He is tired out, and seems worn down by the excessive labors of the session. I then went to the President's house, and after a long time succeeded in entering the east room. There were an immense number present. . . .

SOURCE: Corydon Eustathius Fuller, Reminiscences of James A. Garfield: With Notes Preliminary and Collateral, p. 374-5

Senator James W. Grimes to Elizabeth S. Nealley Grimes, December 10, 1859

Washington, December 10, 1859.

One week of congressional life is over, and I think it to be the stupidest business I was ever engaged in. We have done nothing in the Senate but discuss “John Brown,” “the irrepressible conflict,” and “the impending crisis,” and no one can imagine where the discussion will stop. The House of Representatives is still unorganized, and daily some members come near to blows. The members on both sides are mostly armed with deadly weapons, and it is said that the friends of each are armed in the galleries. The Capitol resounds with the cry of dissolution, and the cry is echoed throughout the city. And all this is simply to coerce, to frighten the Republicans and others into giving the Democrats the organization of the House. They will not succeed.

I called on Mrs. Trumbull to-day. She is the only woman I have spoken with since I came here. I called on another, to whose party I was invited the other day, and did not go; but she was not at home. You cannot imagine how I dislike this fashionable formality. It is terribly annoying, and I think I shall repudiate the whole thing.

SOURCE: William Salter, The Life of James W. Grimes, p. 121-2

Diary of Alexander G. Downing: Monday, October 19, 1863

We were out this morning for our skirmish drill. The scouting expedition returned from Jackson this afternoon and occupied their old camp, while we had to go into open bivouac for the night. The expedition had little difficulty in routing the rebels at Jackson, but lost five or six men killed and quite a number wounded.

Source: Alexander G. Downing, Edited by Olynthus B., Clark, Downing’s Civil War Diary, p. 148

Diary of Charles H. Lynch: July 14, 1863

General Lee and the rebel army have crossed the Potomac River into Virginia. I saw a number of prisoners who were taken at the river. They informed us that we were too late, Lee was pushing up the valley. We are again on the march, going south, up and over the South Mountain. A hot, hard, dusty march as we go pushing along. A soldier's life in the field is a severe one. Came to a halt in the valley, near Sandy Hook. The 2nd Corps passed. Met some of the 14th Connecticut as the corps came to a halt. I had friends in that regiment who I was anxious to see. One who I expected to meet was Walter Standish. I asked for him, was informed that he was killed at Gettysburg. Again on the march. Passed through the town of Sandy Hook, on over the Potomac into Harper's Ferry, crossing the Shenandoah River, up Loudon Heights, into the Loudon Valley, Virginia. Pushing right up the valley to guard the gaps in the Blue Ridge Mountains.

SOURCE: Charles H. Lynch, The Civil War Diary, 1862-1865, of Charles H. Lynch 18th Conn. Vol's, p. 25-6

Sunday, August 17, 2014

2nd Ohio Cavalry

Organized at Cleveland and Camp Dennison, Ohio, August to October, 1861. Duty at Camp Dennison, Ohio, November 1, 1861, to January 27, 1862. Scout duty on the Missouri Border January 27-February 18, 1862. Attached to Doubleday's Brigade, Dept. of Missouri, February to June, 1862. Fort Scott, Kan., to August, 1862. Solomon's Brigade, Dept. of Kansas, to October, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Army of the Frontier, to December, 1862. Columbus, Ohio, to April, 1863. Kautz's 1st Cavalry Brigade, District of Central Kentucky, Dept. Ohio, to June, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 23rd Army Corps, Army Ohio, to August, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 4th Division, 23rd Army Corps, to November, 1863. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division Cavalry, 23rd Army Corps, to February, 1864. Columbus, Ohio, to April, 1864. Cavalry, 9th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May 24, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, and Middle Military Division, to May, 1865. Dept. of Missouri to October, 1865.

SERVICE. – Expedition to Fort Scott, Kan., February 18-March 2, 1862. Action at Independence, Mo., February 22. Expedition to Diamond Grove, Kan., April 15-May 7. Action at Horse Creek May 7. Expedition into Indian Territory May 25-July 8. Action at Grand River June 6. Capture of Fort Gibson July 18. Bayou Bernard July 27. Montevallo August 5. Lone Jack, Mo., August 11. Blount's Campaign in Missouri and Arkansas September 17-December. 3. Expedition to Sarcoxie September 28-30. Newtonia September 30. Occupation of Newtonia October 4. Skirmishes at Carthage, Cow Hill, Cow Skin Prairie, Wolf Creek, Maysville and White River. Ordered to Columbus, Ohio, December, 1862, and duty there till March, 1863. Moved to Somerset, Ky., and duty there till June 27. Mt. Sterling, Ky., March 19 (3rd Battalion). Owensville March 31. Expedition to Monticello and operations in Southeastern Kentucky April 26-May 12. Action at Monticello May 1. Near Mill Springs May 29. Monticello, Rocky Gap and Steubenville June 9. Sanders' Raid in East Tennessee June 14-24 (3rd Battalion). Knoxville June 19-20. Strawberry Plains and Rogers' Gap June 20. Powder Springs Gap June 21. Pursuit of Morgan July 1-25. Columbia, Ky., July 3. Buffington Island, Ohio, July 18-19. Operations in Eastern Kentucky against Scott July 25-August 6. Near Rogersville July 27. Richmond July 28. Lancaster and Paint Lick Bridge July 31. Lancaster August 1. Burnside's Campaign in East Tennessee August 16-October 17. Winter's Gap August 31. Expedition to Cumberland Gap September 4-7. Operations about Cumberland Gap September 7-10. Capture of Cumberland Gap September 9. Greenville September 11. Carter's Depot September 22. Zollicoffer September 24. Jonesboro September 28. Greenville October 2. Blue Springs October 5 and 10. Sweetwater October 10-11. Knoxville Campaign November 4-December 23. Lenoir Station November 14-15. Stock Creek November 15. Siege of Knoxville November 17-December 5. Morristown and Long's Ford December 10. Cheek's Cross Roads December 12. Russellville December 12-13. Bean's Station December 14. Blain's Cross Roads December 16-19. Rutledge December 16. Stone's Mill December 19. Dandridge December 24. Mossy Creek Station December 26. Regiment reenlisted January 1, 1864. On Veteran furlough till March. Ordered to Annapolis, Md., March 20. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 4-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Piney Branch Ford May 8; Spottsylvania May 8-21; Piney Branch Ford May 15; U.S. Ford May 21 (Detachment); North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Mechump's Creek and Hanover Court House May 31. Ashland June 1. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Gaines' Mill, Salem Church, Haw's Shop and Totopotomoy June 2. Haw's Shop June 3-5. Long Bridge and White House Landing June 12. Smith's Store, near Samaria Church, June 15. Wilson's Raid on Southside & Danville Railroad June 22-30. Black and White Station June 23. Staunton River Bridge, or Roanoke Station, June 25. Sappony Church, or Stony Creek, June 28-29. Ream's Station June 29. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Winchester August 17. Summit Point August 21. Charlestown August 21-22. Smithfield and Kearneysville August 25. White Post September 3. Abram's Creek, near Winchester, September 13. Battle of Opequan, Winchester, September 19. Near Cedarville September 20. Front Royal Pike September 21. Milford and Fisher's Hill September 22. Waynesboro September 29. Bridgewater October 4. Near Columbia Furnace October 7. Tom's Brook October 8-9. Cedar Creek October 13. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. New Market November 6. Kearneysville November 10. Newtown and Cedar Creek November 12. Rude's Hill, near Mt. Jackson, November 22. Raid to Lacey's Springs December 19-22. Lacey's Springs December 21. Expedition from Winchester to Moorefield, W, Va., February 4-6, 1865. Sheridan's Raid from Winchester to Petersburg February 27-March 25. Occupation of Staunton March 2. Waynesboro March 2. Occupation of Charlottesville March 3. Ashland March 15. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Dinwiddie Court House March 30-31. Five Forks April 1. Namozine Church April 3. Sailor's Creek April 6. Appomattox Station April 8. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Expedition to Danville April 23-29. March to Washington, D.C., May. Grand Review May 23. Ordered to St. Louis, Mo., May 27. Duty in Dept. of Missouri till October. Mustered out October 12, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 7 Officers and 76 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 5 Officers and 179 Enlisted men by disease. Total 267.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1473-4

Brigadier-General Thomas Kilby Smith to Elizabeth Budd Smith, March 19, 1864

Friday, March 19th.

A messenger has just arrived with despatches from below, and a mail, but no letters for me. I have nothing of importance to add, hardly enough in what I have written to repay perusal; you must not permit yourself to suffer anxiety on my account; the good God whose arm till now has shielded me will care for me to the end. It may be permitted us to meet again and again I may enjoy the pleasure of home. If not, let us all pray that we meet in Paradise.

I see by some newspapers that are brought with this mail that the expedition into Mississippi is misrepresented and misunderstood. I assure you it was entirely successful and all was accomplished that was intended or desired.

SOURCE: Walter George Smith, Life and letters of Thomas Kilby Smith, p. 360-1

Diary of Corydon E. Fuller: Friday, March 3, 1865

The city is filled with strangers who have come here to witness the inauguration. The rain fell heavily last night, and the streets are very muddy, but this afternoon it looks some like clearing off. I hope to-morrow may be pleasant, and an omen of the coming four years, which, God grant, may be years of peace instead of war.

SOURCE: Corydon Eustathius Fuller, Reminiscences of James A. Garfield: With Notes Preliminary and Collateral, p. 374

Senator James W. Grimes to Elizabeth S. Nealley Grimes, November 30, 1859

Washington, November 30, 1859.

Everybody but me is busy about the organization of the House of Representatives. That, and the execution of John Brown day after to-morrow, are the only topics discussed.

I heard Wendell Phillips lecture on l'Ouverture at Philadelphia, to an immense and breathless audience.

SOURCE: William Salter, The Life of James W. Grimes, p. 121

Senator James W. Grimes to Elizabeth S. Nealley Grimes, December 6, 1859


Senate Chamber, December 6th

This body was organized yesterday; Mason, of Virginia, immediately introduced Harper's Ferry resolutions, which are to be taken up, and discussed this morning on the assembling of the Senate. So you see the excitement is to be kept up upon the irrepressible conflict question.

Mr. Sumner appeared in his seat yesterday, looking in vigorous health. We expect to hear from him in a great speech during the session. There is an immense crowd of people here for one purpose and another, but I keep out of it pretty much. I am as retired here as ordinarily at home.

SOURCE: William Salter, The Life of James W. Grimes, p. 121

Governor Samuel J. Kirkwood to James Harlan, James W. Grimes, Samuel R. Curtis and William Vandever, January 28, 1861

Executive Office,
Jan. 28, 1861.

To Hon. Jas. Harlan, Jas. W. Grimes, Samuel R. Curtis and Wm. Vandever:

Gentlemen:—You will find herewith a paper requesting you, if you consider it advisable, to attend a meeting of the commissioners of the different States at Washington City on the 4th of February next. I wish you to be guided wholly by your own discretion as to your attendance.

I confess the whole thing strikes me unfavorably. The very early day named renders it impossible for the distant States to select and send commissioners, and also it is liable to the construction I that it was the intention to force action both upon the meeting and upon Congress before the 4th of March next and without proper time for deliberation. Again the fact that the basis of adjustment proposed in the resolutions is one that all the free States rejected by an overwhelming majority at the presidential election (the votes for Lincoln and Douglass being all against it) indicate that either in expectation that the free Stases shall stultify and degrade themselves or a purpose by the failure of the commissioners to agree upon terms of adjustment to afford excuse and justification to those who are already determined to leave the Union. You upon the ground can judge of these things more correctly than I can here.

Should you find the meeting disposed to act in earnest for the preservation of the Union without seeking the degradation of any of the States for that end permit me to make a few suggestions.

The true policy for every good citizen to pursue is to set his face like a flint against secession, to call it by its true name — treason — to use his influence in all legitimate ways to put it down; strictly and cordially to obey the laws and to stand by the government in all lawful measures it may adopt for the preservation of the Union, and to trust to the people and the constituted authorities to correct under the present constitution, and errors that may have been committed or any evils or wrongs that have been suffered.

But if compromise must be the order of the day then that compromise should not be a concession by one side of all the other side demands and of all for which the conceding side has been contending. In other words the North must not be expected to yield all the South asks, all the North has contended for and won. and then call that compromise. That is not compromise and would not bring peace. Such “compromise” would not become dry on the parchment on which it would be written before “agitation” for its repeal would have commenced. A compromise that would restore good feeling must not degrade either side. Let me suggest how in my opinion this can be done. Restore the Missouri compromise line to the territory we got from France. We all agreed to that once and can, without degradation do so again.

The repeal of that line brought on our present troubles; its restoration ought to go far to remove them. As to New Mexico and Utah leave them under the laws passed for their government in 1850 — the so-called compromise of that year. We all stood there once and can do so again without degradation. This settles the question of slavery in all our present territories. As to future acquisitions say we can't make any. We thus avoid the slavery question in future. We have enough territory for our expansion for a century and let the men of that day make another to suit themselves. It says merely we prefer our Union as it is to conquest that may endanger it. The fugitive slave law was made by the South. The reason of its non-existence is its severity. It is in direct antagonism to the public sentiment of the people among whom it is to be executed. If something were done to modify it so as to require the alleged fugitive to be taken before the officer of the court of the county from which he has alleged to have tied and there have a trial if he demand it, in my opinion the law would be much more effective than it is.

The personal liberty laws arc the acts of the States that have them and I doubt not would be repealed when the present excitement dies away. Iowa never has had nor does she want one.

Very respectfully,
SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

SOURCE: Henry Warren Lathrop, The Life and Times of Samuel J. Kirkwood, Iowa's War Governor, p. 109-11

Diary of Alexander G. Downing: Sunday, October 18, 1863

The Thirteenth went up to Messenger's ford on picket. We had our regular company inspection this morning. In the afternoon I went to the refugees' camp to hear a colored man preach. There was a large number of negroes and they had a joyful time; their singing and shouting beat all that I have ever listened to. They were so happy that they did not cease shouting until after sundown.

Source: Alexander G. Downing, Edited by Olynthus B., Clark, Downing’s Civil War Diary, p. 148

Diary of Charles H. Lynch: July 10, 1863

Continual skirmishing going on with the rebs between Sharpsburg and Hagerstown, Maryland. Reported that General Lee is trying to cross the Potomac River into Virginia. We are either skirmishing or changing our position most of the time so that we are kept on the go about all the time and most of the movements are at double quick time. The most important subject under discussion is, “Why doesn't Meade attack Lee?” as we have a number of regiments here who were not at Gettysburg, having come as reinforcements.

SOURCE: Charles H. Lynch, The Civil War Diary, 1862-1865, of Charles H. Lynch 18th Conn. Vol's, p. 25

38th Illinois Infantry

Organized at Camp Butler, Ill., and mustered in August 15, 1861. Ordered to Pilot Knob, Mo., September 20, 1861. Attached to Dept. of Missouri to March, 1862. 1st Brigade, Steele's Army of Southeast Missouri, to June, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, Army of Mississippi, to September, 1862. 31st Brigade, 9th Division, Army of the Ohio, to October, 1862. 31st Brigade, 9th Division, 3rd Corps, Army Ohio, to November, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, Right Wing 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to January, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 20th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to October, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Army Corps, to June, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Army Corps, to August, 1865. Dept. of Texas to December, 1865.

SERVICE. – Duty at Pilot Knob till March, 1862. Operations about Fredericktown, Mo., October 12-25, 1861. Action at Fredericktown October 21. Expedition against Thompson's forces November 2-12. Moved to Reeve's Station on Black River March 3-10, 1862, thence to Doniphan and Pocahontas March 31-April 21. Action at Putnam's Ferry, Mo., April 1. March to Jacksonport, Ark., April 30-May 4, thence to Cape Girardeau, Mo., May 10-21, and to Hamburg Landing, Tenn., May 21-24. Siege of Corinth, Miss., May 26-30. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 12. March to Jacinto and Ripley June 29-July 4. At Corinth, Miss., till August 14. March through Alabama to Nashville, Tenn., thence to Louisville, Ky., in pursuit of Bragg, August 14-September 26. Pursuit of Bragg into Kentucky October 1-16. Battle of Perryville October 8. Manchester, Ky., October 14. Stanford, Ky., October 14. March to Nashville, Tenn., October 16-November 9, and duty there till December 26. Reconnoissance toward Clarksville November 15-30. Advance on Murfreesboro, Tenn., December 26-30. Nolensville, Knob Gap, December 26. Battle of Stone's River December 30-31, 1862, and January 1-3, 1863. At Murfreesboro till June. Reconnoissance from Murfreesboro March 6-7. Methodist Church on Shelbyville Pike March 6. Reconnoissance to Versailles March 9-14. Operations on Edgeville Pike June 4. Middle Tennessee or Tullahoma Campaign June 24-July 7. Liberty Gap June 24-27. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Passage of Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Battle of Chickamauga, Ga., September 19-20. Siege of Chattanooga September 24-October 27. Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Duty at Bridgeport, Ala., till January 26, 1864. Moved to Ooltewah January 26. Reenlisted February 29, 1864. Veterans on furlough March 28 to June 9, rejoining at Ackworth, Ga. Non-Veterans attached to 101st Ohio Infantry during this time. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May to September, 1864. Tunnel Hill May 6-7. Demonstration on Rocky Faced Ridge May 8-11. Buzzard's Roost Gap May 8-9. Demonstration on Dalton May 9-13. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Near Kingston May 18-19. Near Cassville May 19. Advance on Dallas May 22-25. Operations on line of Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Pine Hill June 11-14. Lost Mountain June 15-17. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Ruff's Station July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Battle of Jonesboro August 31-September 1. Lovejoy Station September 2-6. Pursuit of Hood into Alabama October 3-30. Nashville Campaign November-December. Columbia, Duck River, November 24-27. Spring Hill November 29. Battle of Franklin November 30. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Pursuit of Hood, to the Tennessee River, December 17-28. March to Huntsville, Ala., and duty there till March 13, 1865. Operations in East Tennessee till April 11. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., and duty there till June. Moved to New Orleans, La., June 17-25, thence to Indianola, Texas, July 12-15, and to Victoria, Texas. Duty there till December, 1865. Mustered out December 31, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 7 Officers and 107 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 177 Enlisted men by disease. Total 294.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1062-3

1st Ohio Cavalry

Organized at Camp Chase, Ohio, August 17-October 30, 1861. Left State for Louisville, Ky., December 9, 1861. Attached to 1st Division, Army Ohio, to October, 1862. (Cos. "F," "I," "K," "L" and "M" attached to 5th Division, Army Ohio, May to October, 1862.) Zahm's 2nd Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army Ohio, to November, 1862. (Cos. "F," "I," "K," "L" and "M" attached to 2nd Corps, Army Ohio, to November, 1862.) 2nd Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland, to January, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland, to March, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland, to October, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Wilson's Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi, to February, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, Wilson's Cavalry Corps, to May, 1865. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, Wilson's Cavalry Corps, and Dept. of Georgia, to September, 1865.

SERVICE. – Company "B" was at Headquarters of Gen. Mitchel in Kentucky October to December, 1861.  Action at West Liberty, Ky., October 23. Rejoined Regiment at Louisville, Ky., December, 1861. Operations near Greensburg and Lebanon, Ky., January 28-February 2, 1862. Moved to Louisville, Ky., February 14, thence to Nashville, Tenn., February 28-March 3. Advance on Columbia March 14-15. Near Columbia March 15. March to Savannah, Tenn., March 28-April 7, thence moved to Pittsburg Landing, Tenn. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Pursuit to Booneville May 30-June 12. Reconnoissance toward Carrollville and Baldwyn June 3. Skirmish at Blackland June 3. Osborn's and Wolf Creeks, near Blackland, June 4 (Cos. "E," "I" and "M"). Guard duty along Memphis & Charleston Railroad till August. Near Russellsville July 3 (Cos. "B" and "G"). Expedition to Decatur, Ala., July 12-16 (Detachment). Near Davis Gap July 12 (Detachment). Near Decatur July 15 (Co. "I"). Pond Springs July 24. Courtland and Trinity July 25 (Detachment). Moved to Dechard, Tenn., August 1. Salem August 6. Scout to Fayetteville August 17-20. March to Louisville. Ky., in pursuit of Bragg August 21-September 25. Pursuit of Bragg into Kentucky October 1-22. Cedar Church, near Shepherdstown, October 3. Bardstown October 4. Battle of Perryville October 8 (Detachment). Pursuit of Bragg to Loudon October 10-22. Harrodsburg October 13. Stanford October 14. March to Nashville, Tenn., October 22-November 7. Duty there till December 26. Franklin December 12 and 26. Reconnoissance from Rural Hill December 20. Advance on Murfreesboro December 26-30. Nolinsville December 26. Near Murfreesboro December 29-30. Battle of Stone's River December 30-31, 1862, and January 1-3, 1863. Overall's Creek December 31, 1862. Shelbyville Pike January 5. Duty at Lavergne till June. Reconnoissance from Lavergne May 12. Middle Tennessee or Tullahoma Campaign June 23-July 7. Moore's Ford, Elk River, July 2. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Expedition to Huntsville July 13-22. Passage of Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River, and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Reconnoissance from Stevenson to Trenton, Ga., August 28-31. Reconnoissance from Winston's Gap to Broomtown Valley September 5. Alpine, Ga., September 3 and 8. Reconnoissance from Alpine toward Lafayette, Ga., September 10. Alpine September 11. Battle of Chickamauga, Ga., September 19-21. Cotton Port Ford, Tennessee River, September 30. Operations against Wheeler and Roddy September 30-October 17. Greenville October 2. McMinnville October 4. Farmington October 7. Sim's Farm, near Shelbyville, October 7. At Paint Rock till November 18. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Raid on East Tennessee & Georgia Railroad November 24-27. Charleston November 26. Cleveland November 27. March to relief of Knoxville, Tenn., November 28-December 8. Near Loudoun December 2. Expedition to Murphey, N. C., December 6-11. Charleston and Calhoun December 28. Regiment reenlisted January 4, 1864. Demonstration on Dalton, Ga., February 22-27, 1864 (Non-Veterans). Near Dalton February 23. Tunnel Hill, Buzzard's Roost Gap and Rocky Faced Ridge February 23-25. Tunnel Hill February 25. Buzzard's Roost February 27. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1-September 8, 1864. Decatur, Ala.. May 26. Courtland Road, Ala., May 26. Pond Springs, near Courtland, May 27. Moulton May 28-29. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. McAffee's Cross Roads June 11. Noonday Creek June 15-19 and 27. Kenesaw Mountain June 21. Near Marietta June 23. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Nickajack Creek July 2-5. Rottenwood Creek July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Raid to Covington July 22-24. Siege of Atlanta July 24-August 15. Garrard's Raid to South River July 27-31. Flat Rock Bridge and Lithonia July 28. Kilpatrick's Raid around Atlanta August 18-22. Flint River and Red Oak August 19. Jonesborough August 19. Lovejoy Station August 20. Operations at Chattahoochee River Bridge August 26-September 2. Occupation of Atlanta September 2. Operations against Hood and Forest in North Georgia and North Alabama September 29-November 3. Near Lost Mountain October 4-7. New Hope Church October 5. Dallas October 7. Rome October 10-11. Narrows November 11. Coosaville Road, near Rome, November 13. Near Summerville October 18. Little River October 20. Blue Pond and Leesburg October 21. Coosa River October 25. Ladiga, Terrapin Creek, October 28. Ordered to Louisville, Ky., and, duty there till December. Ordered to Gravelly Springs, Ala., December 28, and duty there till March, 1865. Wilson's Raid to Macon, Ga., March 22-April 24. Near Montevallo March 31. Ebenezer Church April 1. Selma April 2. Montgomery April 12-13. Crawford and Girard April. Columbus and West Point April 16. Capture of Macon April 20. Irwinsville, Ga., May 10. Capture of Jeff Davis. Duty in Georgia and South Carolina till September. Mustered out September 13, 1865.

Companies "A" and "C" ordered to West Virginia September 17, 1861. Attached to Army of Occupation, West Virginia, to October, 1861. Cheat Mountain District. West Virginia, to January, 1862. Landers' Division, Army Potomac, to March, 1862. Shields' 2nd Division, Banks' 5th Army Corps, and Dept. of the Shenandoah, to May, 1862. Cavalry, Shields' Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to June, 1862. Headquarters 2nd Corps, Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. Price's Cavalry Brigade, Military District of Washington, D.C., to March, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Stahel's Cavalry Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to June, 1863. Headquarters 3rd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, to December, 1863. Defences of Washington, D.C., to January, 1864. Participating in skirmish at Bloomery Gap, Va., February 4, 1862. Advance on Winchester March 7-15. Battle of Winchester March 23. Occupation of Mr. Jackson April 17. Battle of Cedar Mountain August 9. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Catlett's Station August 22. Centreville August 27-28. Groveton August 29. Bull Run August 30. Chantilly September 1. Duty in Defences of Washington till June, 1863. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3, 1863. Monterey Gap July 4. Emmettsburg July 5. Hagerstown July 6-12. Falling Waters July 14. Hartwood Church August 28. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Hartwood Church November 5. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. In Defences of Washington, D.C., till January, 1864, when rejoined Regiment.

Regiment lost during service 6 Officers and 45 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 150 Enlisted men by disease. Total 204.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1472-3

Saturday, August 16, 2014

John Brown to his Children, August 24, 1854

Akron, Ohio, Aug. 24, 1854.

Dear Children, — I have just received Henry's letter of the 13th instant, and have much reason to be thankful for the good news it brings. We are all in middling health, so far as I know, in this quarter, although there is some sickness about us. Mother Brown, of Hudson, was complaining some last week; have not heard from her since then. This part of the country is suffering the most dreadful drouth ever experienced during this nineteenth century. We have been much more highly favored than most of our neighbors in that we were enabled to secure a most excellent hay crop, whilst many others did not get theirs saved in time, and lost it notwithstanding the dry weather. Our oats are no better than those of our neighbors, but we have a few. We shall probably have some corn, while others, to a great extent, will have none. Of garden vegetables we have more than twenty poor families have in many cases. Of fruit we shall have a comfortable supply, if our less favored neighbors do not take it all from us. We ought to be willing to divide. Our cattle (of which we have thirty-three head) we are enabled to keep in excellent condition, on the little feed that grows on the moist grounds, and by feeding the stalks green that have failed of corn, — and we have a good many of them. We have had two light frosts, on August the 9th and 18th, but have had more extreme hot weather in July and August than ever known before, — thermometer often up to 98° in the shade, and was so yesterday; it now stands (eleven o'clock P. M.) at 93°. I am thinking that it may be best for us to dispose of all the cattle we want to sell, and of all our winter feed, and move a few choice cattle to North Elba this fall, provided we can there buy hay and other stuff considerably cheaper than we might sell our stuff for here, and also provided we can get a comfortable house to winter in. I want you to keep writing me often, as you can learn how hay, all kinds of grain, and roots can be bought with you, so that I may be the better able to jndge. Our last year's pork proves to be a most perfect article, but I think not best to ship any until the weather gets a little cooler. The price Mr. Washburn asks for his contract may not be much out of the way, but there seems to be some difficulty about a bargain yet. First, he wants to hang on all his stock, and I do not know at present as I want any of them. I do not know what he has on hand; he may perhaps be able to get them off himself. Then, again, I do not know as Mr. Smith1 would give a deed of half the lot before the whole purchase-money for the entire lot and interest are paid. You may have further information than I have. Early in the season all kinds of cattle were high, scarce and ready cash; now, as the prospects are, I am entirely unable to make an estimate of what money I can realize on them, so as to be able to say just now how much money I can raise, provided those other impediments can be got over. I intend to turn all I consistently can into money, and as fast as I can, and would be glad to secure the purchase of Washburn, if it can be done consistently and without too much trouble. Write me again soon, and advise as far as you can about all these matters. We could probably sell all our produce at pretty high prices. How are cattle, horses, sheep, and hogs selling in your quarter?

Your affectionate father,
John Brown.
_______________

1 Gerrit Smith, who still owned much land at North Elba.

 SOURCE: Franklin B. Sanborn, The Life and Letters of John Brown, p. 158-9